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Friday, July 13, 2012

Flipping the Classroom

I have been flipping my classroom this last year with some great results. Actually, here is an article that was written about flipping the classroom in low-income schools. (I was interviewed for part of the article!)

One of the amazing impacts flipping had on my students was really engaging them in the classroom. This, along with Whole Brain Teaching, have made a huge impact in student achievement in the areas of math and science!

From the report:

Promise of the ‘flipped classroom’ eludes poorer school districts

By Sarah Butrymowicz
 


When Portland, Ore., elementary school teacher Sacha Luria decided last fall to try out a new education strategy called “flipping the classroom,” she faced a big obstacle.

Flipped classrooms use technology—online video instruction, laptops, DVDs of lessons—to reverse what students have traditionally done in class and at home to learn. Listening to lectures becomes the homework assignment so teachers can provide more one-on-one attention in class and students can work at their own pace or with other students.

But Luria realized that none of her students had computers at home, and she had just one in the classroom. So she used her own money to buy a second computer and begged everyone she knew for donations, finally bringing the total to six for her 23 fourth-graders at Rigler School. In her classroom, students now alternate between working on the computers and working with her.
So far, the strategy is showing signs of success. She uses class time to tailor instruction to students who started the school year behind their classmates in reading and math, and she has seen rapid improvement. By the end of the school year, she said, her students have averaged two years’ worth of progress in math, for example.


“It’s powerful stuff,” she said, noting that this year was her most successful in a decade of teaching. “I’m really able to meet students where they are as opposed to where the curriculum says they should be.”


Other teachers in high-poverty schools like Rigler also report very strong results after flipping classrooms. Greg Green, principal of Clintondale High School in Clinton Township, Mich., thinks the flipped classroom—and the unprecedented amount of one-on-one time it provides students—could even be enough to close the achievement gap between low-income, minority students and their more affluent white peers. Clintondale has reduced the percentage of Fs given out from about 40 percent to around 10 percent.

To read more of the report, here is a link to the rest of the article:

http://hechingerreport.org/content/promise-of-the-flipped-classroom-eludes-poorer-school-districts_8748/

Are you interested in learning about how to flip your own classroom? I'm working on a class through HOL on flipping the classroom.

HOL online classes I offer:



RENEWING OURSELVES & OUR TEACHING
FIRST DAYS OF SCHOOL: From Stress to Success
ORGANIZING FROM THE INSIDE OUT
SAVE TIME: Time Management for Your Teaching & Your Life   

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